Past Course Approved for Engineering

Note to students:

-This file is a work in progress
-Students are encouraged to look for study abroad courses outside of this list
-Courses and time schedules may change (Please double check)

All courses are not guaranteed to provide credit. Please double check with your academic advisor for final approval.

Date course was approved by an engineer counselor Major Year student wishes to study abroadSemester Abroad(At that time) Country Program/UniversityUCI CourseUCI Course Description Equivalent Abroad CourseAbroad Course TitleAbroad Course Description Abroad Course WebsiteNote 1Note 2
2014Aerospace EngineeringKorea (South)Yonsei SummerEcon 20AECON 87S Principle Microecon
All MajorsSummerSummerEngland Sussex (Summer)ECON 20A. Basic Economics 2The fundamentals of microeconomics. The behavior of firms and consumers: markets, supply/demand, utility maximization, resource allocation, and efficiency. Course may be offered online.IS 163Marketing StrategyUnderstand the role of marketing in strategy formulation and within the wider organisational context of strategic management. Define Strategic Marketing and its core concepts and demonstrate understanding of the conceptual framework of strategic marketing planning and implementation. Critically assess and interpret dynamic, competitive market/industry environments and competitive options available to strategic marketing planners.Show how strategic marketing can be effectively used in rapidly changing business and industry environments, and how it is key in building sustainable competitive advantage.Demonstrate team working and personal-and team-organising skills. Marketing managers aim to develop and implement marketing strategies that can create and sustain competitive advantage for the organisation in the marketplace, not just for today, but into the foreseeable future. This module provides youwith theoretical and practical perspectives of marketing strategy, the strategic marketing planning process and associated activities, including customer relationship management, market-led innovation and marketing measurement.
https://www.sussex.ac.uk/webteam/gateway/file.php?name=marketing-strategy.pdf&site=71 Take this and a GE
All MajorsSummerSummerEngland Sussex (Summer)ECON 20A. Basic Economics 1The fundamentals of microeconomics. The behavior of firms and consumers: markets, supply/demand, utility maximization, resource allocation, and efficiency. Course may be offered online.IS 233Introduction to Marketing: Marketing for Non-marketers Define the Principles of Marketing and its core concepts.Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of how Marketing is used effectively in Businesses and how it is key in building sustainable competitive advantages.Demonstrate an understanding of the various marketing tools and functions and how these interact and contribute to the internal, and external activities of a business, including suppliers, distributors, and sales forces.Demonstrate understanding of Consumer and Business buying behaviour.This module is aimed at ‘non-marketing’ students who wish to understand the critical importance of good marketing in any business.You explore various aspects of the marketing process, including environmental scanning, marketing mix, customer relationship management, and sales andsupplier management. Through case study analysis and practical application, you examine how to use marketing to gain and sustain a business advantage, for both survival and growth.https://www.sussex.ac.uk/webteam/gateway/file.php?name=introduction-to-marketing.pdf&site=71 Take this and a GE
All MajorsSummerSummerIrelandUniv. College Dublin (Summer)CHEM 1A and CHEM 1BAtomic structure; general properties of the elements; covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding; intermolecular forces; mass relationships. Properties of gases, liquids, solids; changes of state; properties of solutions; stoichiometry; thermochemistry; and thermodynamics.Chemistry for Scientists and Engineers 1 & 2 1.The principal aim of this course is to provide a firm understanding of chemical concepts and processes leaning heavily upon standard U.S. chemistry textbooks. Thecourse introduces the background to our current understanding of atomic structure and describes the modern view of the atom in terms of quantum theory. The quantum theory is applied to the electronic structure of the elements and is used to demonstrate how the chemical and physical properties of elements are related to the arrangement of the electrons in atoms. The quantum approach is then applied to understand the ways in which atoms form bonds with each other in molecules and how different modes of bonding canaffect the structure, shape and properties of molecules. Finally, the range of interactions that can occur between atoms and molecules are explored and the roles that such interactions play in determining the properties of various materials are examined. Spectroscopic principles and methods are discussed and applied throughout. 2 The principal aim of this course is to provide a firm understanding of chemical concepts and processes leaning heavily upon standard U.S. chemistry textbooks. The course introduces the study of the fundamental relationships that underpin the physical and chemical statesof matterwith anaim to developingan understanding at the molecular and atomic level of how materials behave and how chemical reactions occur. In this course a number of key areas of physical chemistry will be expounded and their application to chemical systems explored. These will consider (a) the nature of energy change in a chemical reaction, (b) the extent to which a reaction is favoured and (c) the rate of chemical reactions. Initially thecourse will consider both the empirical origin, and the molecular theory, of the laws that govern behavior of ideal gases. Next the exchange of chemical energy from a system to its surroundings in the form of heat and work flow will be explored through the study of the laws of thermodynamics. Through the study of thermochemistry the heat energy change for a chemical reaction will be probed. In addition, the role nature of chemical equilibria and the factors governing the drive to reactants and products will be studied. Finally,the rates of reaction will be considered through the study of chemical kinetics.DurationThis course will take place over four weeks(i.e., weeks 5-8inclusive).ObjectivesBy the end of this course it is to be expected that the students will have acquired an understanding of keyconcepts and principles in chemistryas follows:Part 1: Introduction1.Introduction to physical chemistry; measurements & units2.Energy & changes of state3.The properties of gases a.Empirical gas laws, Idealgas law, partial pressuresb.Kinetic model of gases, Maxwell’s distribution of speedsc.Diffusion, Real gases, collisions, molecular interactionsLearning outcomes: Students will:
http://eap.ucop.edu/Documents/OurPrograms/Ireland/UniversityCollegeDublin/UCEAP_UCD_Chemistry_for_Scientists_Engineers_courses_1and2.pdf
All MajorsSummerSummerScotland Univ. of Glasgow (Summer)GE III. Social and Behavioral Sciences and GE VIII. International/Global IssuesGE III. Social and Behavioral Sciences and GE VIII. International/Global IssuesScotland, the City of Glasgowand the Origins of the Modern WorldThis course examines the history, politics, culture and socio-economic development of Scotland and, in doing so, will explore the historic and contemporary understandings of Scottish nationalism. You will be introduced to Scottish heroes such as William ‘Braveheart’ Wallace and Robert the Bruce who led the Scottish Wars of Independence against England. You will come to understand how this small country of just a few million people has had an enormous impact on the course of world history. You will explore the role of Scotland and particularly the city of Glasgow, ‘Second City of the Empire’, which lay at the heart of the industrial revolution that transformed the world.The ideas of philosophers and cultural figures living in Scotland during what became known asthe Scottish Enlightenment shaped the modern world. Discoveries and inventions flowing out ofScotland during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries included: the modern steam engine,television, telephone, penicillin, flushing toilet, radar, refrigerator, tarmac, and electromagnetism (the basis for mobile phones and wifi). Scottish culture remains prominent through figures such Arthur Conan Doyle to J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan, Ian Fleming’s James Bond and J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter.You will learn how the re-awakening of Scottish national identity in the 20th and 21stcenturies led to the establishment of a Scottish Parliament in 1999 with some devolveddecision-making powers from the United Kingdom government; and to the IndependenceReferendum on 18 September 2014. In this Referendum, the Scottish people voted againstScotland becoming a separate nation by a margin of 55 to 45 percent on a record turnout of85 percent. This course will discuss the aftermath of the Independence Referendum and the stunning victory the following year of the Scottish National Party (SNP) in the 2015 UK General Electionhttp://eap.ucop.edu/Documents/OurPrograms/united_kingdom/Summer-Science-Glasgow/UoG_UCal_SS_6Nov2015-Glasgow%20culture%20course-online.pdf Fulfills 2 GEs?
All Majors (Ideally for the Summer between freshman and sophmore year)SummerSummerEngland Sussex (Summer)PHYSICS 7D. Classical Physics and PHYSICS 7LDElectricity and magnetism.IS129 Introductory Physics II This calculus-based module will provide a firm foundation in physical concepts and principles, covering electricity and magnetism, light, geometric optics, interference, wave-particle duality, atomic and nuclear physics. Applications of physical concepts will be stressed, particularly those related to biological and medical phenomena as well as those forming the basis of much of modern technology. You gain further insight into the physics taught by carrying out a series of laboratory experiments and learning how to analyse and interpret the data.http://www.sussex.ac.uk/iss/modules/subjects/physics Physics students: You must take both Introductory Physics 1 and 2, even if you have previous knowledge in some of the topics covered. For more information, visit http://eap.ucop.edu/OurPrograms/United_Kingdom_England/Pages/summer-university-of-sussex.aspx
All Majors (Ideally for the Summer between freshman and sophmore year)SummerSummerEngland Sussex (Summer)PHYSICS 7C. Classical Physics, PHYSICS 7LC and PHYSICS 7ETopics include force, energy, momentum, rotation, and gravity. Fluids; oscillations; waves; and optics. IS128 Introductory Physics I This calculus-based module will provide a firm foundation in physical concepts and principles, covering kinematics and dynamics, fluids, elasticity, wave motion, sound, ideal gases, heat and thermodynamics. Applications of physical concepts will be stressed, particularly those related to biological and medical phenomena as well as those forming the basis of much of modern technology. You gain further insight into the physics taught by carrying out a series of laboratory experiments and learning how to analyse and interpret the data. http://www.sussex.ac.uk/iss/modules/subjects/physicsPhysics students: You must take both Introductory Physics 1 and 2, even if you have previous knowledge in some of the topics covered. For more information, visit http://eap.ucop.edu/OurPrograms/United_Kingdom_England/Pages/summer-university-of-sussex.aspx
All Majors (Ideally for the Summer between freshman and sophmore year)SummerSummerIrelandUniv. College Dublin (Summer)PHYSICS 7C, PHYSICS 7LC, , PHYSICS 7D, PHYSICS 7LD and PHYSICS 7ETopics include force, energy, momentum, rotation, and gravity. Fluids; oscillations; waves; and optics. Electricity and magnetism.Introductory Physics I and Introductory Physics IIBy the end of this course it is to be expected that the students will have acquired an understanding of the following concepts and principles: oVelocity and acceleration of an object oThe gravitational force and the weight of an object oWork and both potential energy and kinetic energy oTorque and rotational motion oImpulse and both linear momentum and angular momentum oPressure in a fluid and viscous flow oElastic deformation and oscillatory motion oWave motion oTransmission of sound oThe properties of an ideal gas oThe nature of heat oThermodynamics 3. Reading List The core text (which is Calculus based) is: 'Serway's Principles of Physics' by Jewett & Serway (publisher: Thomson, 5th edition, 2013). Most of the assigned problems in the course will be taken from this book. Please note this coretextis supplied as an e-book free of charge to all students.Other problems will be taken from, 'Physics' by Halliday, Resnick & Walker (publisher: Wiley) which is also a calculus-based text. By the end of this course it is to be expected that the students will have acquired an understanding of the following concepts and principles: oThe concepts of electric fields and electric potentials oAn appreciation of electric currents oThe concept of magnetic fields oElectromagnetic waves oThe refraction of light oGeometric optics oOptical instruments oThe interference of light and other electromagnetic waves oWave/particle duality oEarly quantum mechanics oAtomic physics oNuclear structure oRadioactivity
http://eap.ucop.edu/Documents/OurPrograms/Ireland/UniversityCollegeDublin/UCD%20Physics%20Introductory%20Physics%20I%20-%20Syllabus-%20Calculus%20based%20-%20Summer%20Session%202015-online.pdf chrome-extension://oemmndcbldboiebfnladdacbdfmadadm/http://eap.ucop.edu/Documents/OurPrograms/Ireland/UniversityCollegeDublin/UCD%20Physics%20Introductory%20Physics%20II%20-%20Syllabus%20-Calculus%20based%20-%20Summer%20Session%202015-online.pdf
All Majors (Ideally for the Summer between freshman and sophmore year)SummerSummerScotland Univ. of Glasgow (Summer)PHYSICS 7C, PHYSICS 7LC, , PHYSICS 7D, PHYSICS 7LD and PHYSICS 7ETopics include force, energy, momentum, rotation, and gravity. Fluids; oscillations; waves; and optics. Electricity and magnetism.PHYS1018 & 1019 PHYSICS for Physical Sciences & Engineering 1 &This is a calculus-based level 1 university physics course with a laboratory component for international summer students who are pursuing science and engineering degrees. The course consists of two consecutive 15 credits 4 weeks long modules. (This is equivalent to 6 UC quarter units for each module.) This intensive course introduces fundamental concepts of physics as a foundation for more advanced studies in Physics and applications in other areas of science and engineering. Module 1: “mechanics, waves and optics” covers the topics of motion, Newton laws, work, energy, linear and angular momentum, rotation, equilibrium, gravitation, damped and driven oscillators, mechanical and acoustic waves, geometric and wave optics. Modules 2: “electric & magnetic fields, electrodynamics and special relativity” covers electrostatics: electric field and potential, capacitors, and dielectrics; currents and DC circuits; magnetic field; Ampere law, Faraday law, inductance, and LRC circuits; Maxwell equations in integral and differential form and Special relativity. Competence in level 1 calculus as well as algebra, geometry and trigonometry is essential. http://eap.ucop.edu/Documents/OurPrograms/united_kingdom/Summer-Science-Glasgow/US4E_PHYS_syllabus_17_online.pdfThe physics sequence allows students to complete the equivalent of one year of physics for physical sciences and engineering
2014Biomedical EngineeringAustraliaUNIVS SPRING ( NSW)BME 140BIOE 125Biomed Instrument
2014Biomedical EngineeringAustraliaUNIVS SPRING ( NSW)BME 121BIOE 110Cardiovascular Syst
2014Biomedical EngineeringAustraliaUNIVS SPRING ( NSW)BME 110BENGR 23Engr Mechanics
2011Biomedical EngineeringTurkeyBOGAZICI SUMMERMath 3DMATH 100SDiff Equations
2015Biomedical EngineeringUnited KingdomUNIVS FALL (Glasgow)BME 60B AND 60CBIOE 111Biomedical Engineering
2015Biomedical EngineeringUnited KingdomUNIVS FALL (Glasgow)BME 110CBIOE 133Bio Fluid Mechanics
2015Biomedical EngineeringUnited KingdomUNIVS FALL (Glasgow)BME 110BBioE 40Dynamics 1
2015Biomedical EngineeringUnited KingdomUNIVS FALL (Glasgow)BME 110AENGR 80Statics 1
2014Chemical Engineering SingaporeNUS FALLChem 131ACHEM 104Physical Chemistry
2012Chemical Engineering SwedenLUND YEARSpecialization Elective (Environ Engr)CE 158Plymer Chem
2012Chemical Engineering SwedenLUND YEARCBEMS 125CCE 143Mass Transfer Systems
2012Chemical Engineering SwedenLUND YEARCBEMS 125ACE 145A Fluid Mechanics
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Winter Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRCEE 171. Water Resources Engineering. Principles governing the analysis and design of water resource systems including pressurized pipelines, pipe networks, channels, and ground water. Coverage of fluid mass, momentum and energy conservation, flow resistance, and related laboratory measurements in different systems. Materials fee.CVEN2501Principles of Water EngineeringThe object of CVEN2501 is to introduce students to the practice of water engineering. Topics discussed include properties of fluids, manometry, hydrostatics, the principles of mass conservation, energy conservation, the forces and momentum in flowing fluids, flow in pipes, boundary layers, dimensional analysis, physical models, flow in open channels inclusive of specific energy, Manning and Chezy equations, uniform flow, subcritical and supercritical flow, hydraulic jumps, and gradually varied flow profiles.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/CVEN2501.html
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Spring Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRCEE 160. Environmental Processes.Introduction to environmental processes in air and water, mass balances, and transport phenomena. Fundamentals of water-quality engineering including water and wastewater treatment.CVEN4701Planning Sustainable InfrastructureThe course enables environmental engineers to analyse and design sustainable infrastructure to support the needs of regional economies and populations. It builds on and applies the concepts learned in introductory tools, water and transport courses in Stages 1 to 3 of the program. It provides a regional planning context to the planning and design of infrastructure in the areas of water and waste management, transport services, energy supply and distribution; and provides a series of case studies to illustrate the principles of sustainable infrastructure design.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/CVEN4701.html
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Spring Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRCEE 151C. Reinforced Concrete Design.Ultimate strength design. Design of reinforced concrete beam sections. Design for shear and deflection. Design of columns. Design of isolated and combined footings. Laboratory sessions. Materials fee. CVEN4301Advanced Concrete StructuresA course on concrete materials and the design of reinforced concrete structural elements subject to bending, shear and combined bending and axial compression. These include: concrete materials (cements, aggregates and admixtures and hardened concrete properties) concrete mechanical properties, reinforcement types and properties; durability requirements; behaviour of reinforced concrete cross-sections in bending at both service and ultimate loads; ultimate strength analysis and design of cross‐sections in flexure (singly and doubly reinforced, ductility); serviceability analysis and design of beams (cracked section analysis, deflection and crack control); ultimate strength in shear; bond anchorage and curtailment (simple and continuous beams and one‐way slabs); short and slender concrete columns (interaction diagrams). http://timetable.unsw.edu.au/2017/CVEN4301.html
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Winter Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRCEE 151A. Structural Analysis. Fundamentals of structural analysis and loading. Deformation of statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Influence lines. Structural systems.CVEN9820Computational Structural MechanicsStiffness analysis of structures. Basis of finite elements: principle of virtual work, variational theorems, constraint equations. Effects of inplane rigid floors and axially rigid members on the behaviour of multi-storey frames.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2017/CVEN9820.html
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Fall Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRCEE 150Stresses and strains, strain-stress diagrams, axial deformations, torsion, bending and shear stresses in beams, shear force and bending moment diagrams, combined stresses, principal stresses, Mohr's circle, deflection of beams, columns.MMAN 2400 Mechanics of SolidsThis is the fundamental engineering course for mechanical engineers, with content as follows: Stress, strain. tension/compression test, stress/strain diagram and relationships, Hooke's law, strain energy, Poisson's ratio. shear stress/strain diagram, failure due to creep and fatigue, axial (thermal) stress/strain, geometrical properties of plane figures & second moment of area, simple bending stress, deflections in beams, torsion of circular shafts, helical springs, statically determinate/indeterminate systems, introduction to finite elements, combined stresses, membrane stresses in thin cylindrical and spherical pressure vessels, stress/strain variation at a point in 2D (Mohr's circle), stress variation in 3D.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/MMAN2400.htmlDoes not count for MAE 150L. Can be taken during the summer though
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Winter Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRCEE 130. Soil MechanicsMechanics of soils, composition and classification of soils, compaction, compressibility and consolidation, shear strength, seepage, bearing capacity, lateral earth pressure, retaining walls, piles.CVEN3202Soil MechanicsAn introductory course to fundamentals of soil mechanics. Topics include: description of soil, basic phase relationships, clay mineralogy, confined and unconfined seepage, principle of effective stress, consolidation theory, compaction, stress distribution and settlement, Mohr circle, failure criterion, strength of soils, soil testing, stress-strain behaviour of soils and slope stability.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/CVEN3202.html 130Lab not count
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Fall Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRCEE 121 Transportation Systems I: Analysis and Design. Introduction to analysis and design of fundamental transportation system components, basic elements of geometric and pavement design, vehicle flow and elementary traffic, basic foundations of transportation planning and forecasting. Laboratory sessions.CVEN2402Transport Engineering &Environmental SustainabilitThe course is presented as 2 strands. The first strand is concerned with transport planning concepts and fundamentals of traffic theory. The transport planning component dwells on technical applications related to interactions between transport, land use and the environment. Topics include: introduction to four step transport planning process, transport network principles and their applications, transport demand models and sustainable transport strategies. The traffic theory component introduces basics of traffic engineering relationships, performance characteristics of roads, traffic management and delay computations in relation to unsignalised intersections and roundabouts. This strand is allocated approximately 2/3 of teaching content and is common for both Civil and Environmental Engineering students.The second strand is specifically for Environmental students. This strand focuses on the environmental impacts of transport and sustainable development. Topics include: assessment of environmental and community impacts from traffic noise, vehicle emissions and air pollution. It also includes EIA of major transport projects, concepts of transport policy, international trends and sustainable transport.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/CVEN2402.html
2011Civil Engineering AustraliaUNIVS FALL (Perth)Econ 20AECON 15Microecon
2011Civil Engineering AustraliaUNIVS FALL (Perth)CEE 170 or MAE 130AENGR 11Hydraulics
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Fall Quarter)1st and 2ndHong Kong HKUENGRCEE 170.Introduction to Fluid Mechanics.Thermodynamic and mechanical fluid properties; fluid statics; control volume and differential approaches for mass, momentum, and energy; dimensional analysis and similarity.CIVL2103Fluid mechanicsThe course introduces the fundamental concepts of fluid flow, and examples of engineering fluid mechanics. The course helps students to develop a sound understanding of control volume analysis, and its use with mass, momentum, and energy conservation principles. The course prepares students for dimensional analysis for the use of scale models in wind tunnel and hydraulic model testinghttp://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-CivE-14-15-4Y.pdf
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Spring Quarter)2ndHong Kong HKUENGRCEE 160 Environmental ProcessesIntroduction to environmental processes in air and water, mass balances, and transport phenomena. Fundamentals of water-quality engineering including water and wastewater treatment.CIVL3121Water resources engineering CIVL3121 is a course that focuses on the concept, theory, design and operation of urban water supply systems. Emphasis will be placed upon a fundamental understanding of commonly used water collection and treatment technologies. Major sections of the course cover water cycle, water consumption and demand, water collection, storage and transportation, drinking water quality, conventional surface water treatment unit operations and processes, advanced water treatment technologies, water stabilisation and corrosion control, urban water distribution and transmission, water reclamation and total water management. The course aims to introduce to students the basic concept of water resources engineering and the knowledge of urban water supply. At the end of this course, students who fulfill the requirement of the course will be able to present the principles and theories behind the common water collection and treatment technologies and to conduct conceptual design of freshwater collection systems, common surface water treatment processes and urban water distribution systems.http://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-CivE-14-15-4Y.pdf
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Spring Quarter)1st and 2ndHong Kong HKUENGRCEE 151C. Reinforced Concrete DesignUltimate strength design. Design of reinforced concrete beam sections. Design for shear and deflection. Design of columns. Design of isolated and combined footings. Laboratory sessions. Materials fee.CIVL3118Theory and design of structures IIIThe theory part of the course introduces the theory and applications of the matrix method for static and stability analyses of two-dimensional structures together with the elastic and plastic torsional analyses of thin-walled sections. The design part of the course introduces the concept and principles of inelastic design of reinforced concrete structures with emphasis on plastic hinge formation and moment redistribution. On practical design aspects, ultimate limit state design as per Hong Kong Concrete Code of special structural members such as two-way slabs, flat slabs, torsion members and slender columns will be discussed and explained. The course also includes a section of serviceability limit state design of large civil water-retaining reinforced concrete structures, such as underground box culverts, open channels, manholes, inspection chambers and water/sewage treatment tankshttp://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-CivE-14-15-4Y.pdf
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Winter Quarter)1st and 2ndHong Kong HKUENGRCEE 151A. Structural Analysis.Fundamentals of structural analysis and loading. Deformation of statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Influence lines. Structural systems.CIVL2107Theory and design of structures II This course is the second of three consecutive courses on Theory and Design of Structures. This course aims to provide students with knowledge and understanding in behaviour, analysis and design of statically indeterminate structures. http://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-CivE-14-15-4Y.pdf
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Winter Quarter)1st and 2ndHong Kong HKUENGRCEE 130. Soil Mechanics. Mechanics of soils, composition and classification of soils, compaction, compressibility and consolidation, shear strength, seepage, bearing capacity, lateral earth pressure, retaining walls, piles.CIVL2106Soil mechanicsSoil mechanics is a branch of engineering mechanics that describes the behaviour of soils. It differs from fluid mechanics and solid mechanics in the sense that soils consist of a heterogeneous mixture of fluids (usually air and water) and particles (usually clay, silt, sand and gravel) but soil may also contain organic solids, liquids, and gasses and other matter. Along with rock mechanics, soil mechanics provides the theoretical basis for analysis in geotechnical engineering. Soil mechanics is used to analyze the deformations of and flow of fluids within natural and man-made structures that are supported on or made of soil, or structures that are buried in soils. Examples applications are building and bridge foundations, retaining walls, dams, and buried pipeline systems. http://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-CivE-14-15-4Y.pdf
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Fall Quarter)1st and 2ndHong Kong HKUENGRCEE 121. Transportation Systems I: Analysis and Design. Introduction to analysis and design of fundamental transportation system components, basic elements of geometric and pavement design, vehicle flow and elementary traffic, basic foundations of transportation planning and forecasting. Laboratory sessions.CIVL2111Transportation engineering This course is an introductory course of Transportation Engineering, and covers the causes and motivations of the movements of people and goods, the basic characteristics of different transportation modes, land use and transportation planning, equilibrium analysis, cost-benefit analysis, travel demand modeling and forecasting, highway alignment and geometric design, transportation surveys, and traffic impact assessment. Hong Kong examples will be used if possiblehttp://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-CivE-14-15-4Y.pdf chrome-extension://oemmndcbldboiebfnladdacbdfmadadm/http://www.civil.hku.hk/civil_intranet/beng/pdf/16-17/BEng_sem_1_timetable-2016-17-v1.pdf
Civil Engineering 3rd Year (Spring Quarter)1st and 2ndHong Kong HKUENGRCEE 110. Methods III: Modeling, Economics, and Management.Analysis, modeling, and management of civil engineering systems. Statistics and system performance studies, probabilistic models and simulation, basic economics and capital investments, project elements and organization, managerial concepts and network technique, project scheduling. Emphasis on real-world examples. Laboratory sessions.CIVL2108.Principles of civil engineering management (Civil engineering projects are characterised by their uniqueness, complexity and uncertainty, and these have posed immense challenges to our industry. To satisfy the client and project requirements, a good management skill and knowledge is of paramount importance. While engineers play a key role in relevant government departments, client organisations, design offices and contracting firms, they have the responsibilities of improving the efficiency, safety and quality of civil engineering projects and maximisingthe chance of project success and discharging their duties ethically. Therefore, the aims of this course are to introduce the basic concepts of various aspects of management and to explain how to apply these management principles to plan, organise and control a civil engineering project. http://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-CivE-14-15-4Y.pdf
2012Civil Engineering IrelandUNIVS FALL ( Univ Col Dub )EngrCEE 170 or MAE 130AME 102Mechanics of Fluids
2012Civil Engineering IrelandUNIVS FALL ( Univ Col Dub )EngrCEE 130 AND 130LCIVE 106Soil Mechanics
2012Civil Engineering NetherlandsUNIV COLL UTRECHT FALLEngin Sci ElectiveEARTH103Earth & Environ II
2012Civil Engineering NetherlandsUNIV COLL UTRECHT FALLEcon 20BECON 106Macroeconomics
2012Civil Engineering NetherlandsUNIV COLL UTRECHT FALLEcon 20AECON 10Intro to Economics
2012Civil Engineering New ZealandUNIVS FALL (Auckland)Upper Div Writing GEENGR 128Tech Comm for Engrs
2012Civil Engineering New ZealandUNIVS FALL (Auckland)EngrCEE 171CIVE 131Hydraulic Engr
2012Civil Engineering New ZealandUNIVS FALL (Auckland)EngrCEE 153CIVE 122Structures & Designs
2012Civil Engineering New ZealandUNIVS FALL (Auckland)EngrCEE 151B for Struct Eng SpecCIVE 125Civ Eng Materials
2012Civil Engineering New ZealandUNIVS FALL (Auckland)EngrCEE 130 AND 130LCIVE 129Geomechanics
2012Civil Engineering SingaporeNUS YEAREngrCEE 160ENGR 101Environmental Process
2014Civil Engineering SingaporeNUS YEAREngrCEE 151CCIVE 123Concrete Design
2014Civil Engineering SingaporeNUS YEAREngrCEE 150 AND 150LCIVEE 120Structural Mech
2014Civil Engineering SingaporeNUS YEAREngrCEE 130 AND 130LCIVE 119Soul Mechanics
2014Civil Engineering SingaporeNUS YEARCEE 170 or MAE 130AEAP COURSESEAP Approvd Courses
2014Civil Engineering United KingdomSUSSEX SUMMERPhysics 7D/7LDPHYSICS 13SPhysics II
2014Civil Engineering United KingdomSUSSEX SUMMERPhysics 7C/7LCPHYSICS 12SPhysics I
2012Civil Engineering United KingdomUNIVS YEAR (Imperial Col London)EngrCEE 171CIVE 107Fluids Design
2012Civil Engineering United KingdomUNIVS YEAR (Imperial Col London)EngrCEE 161CIVE 123YWater Resource
2012Civil Engineering United KingdomUNIVS YEAR (Imperial Col London)EngrCEE 151C AND EngrCEE151B for Struct Eng SpecCIVE 113Constructionatium
2012Civil Engineering United KingdomUNIVS YEAR (Imperial Col London)EngrCEE 151ACIVE 114YCreative Design 2
2012Civil Engineering United KingdomUNIVS YEAR (Imperial Col London)EngrCEE 150 AND 150LCIVE 119Y AND 115YStruct Mech AND Struc Des
2012Civil Engineering United KingdomUNIVS YEAR (Imperial Col London)EngrCEE 130 AND 130LCIVE 118YSoil&Engin Geology
2014Civil Engineering United KingdomLONDON SCHOOL OF ECON SUMEcon 20BECON 52SIntr Macroecon
2012Civil Engineering United KingdomLONDON SCHOOL OF ECON SUMEcon 20AECON 51SIntr Microecon
2012Civil Engineering United KingdomUNIVS YEAR (Imperial Col London)CEE170 or MAE 130ACIVE 121YFluid Mechanics
2015Computer Sci & EngineeringIrelandSCI ENGR UNIV COLL DUBLIN SUMMERPhysics 7D/7LDPHYS 17SPhys for Life Sci 2
2015Computer Sci & EngineeringIrelandSCI ENGR UNIV COLL DUBLIN SUMMERPhysics 7C/7LCPHYS 16SPhys for Life Sci 1
2015Computer Sci & EngineeringUnited KingdomUNIVS FALL (Edinburgh)Tech ElectiveCPS 135Software Engineering
2015Computer Sci & EngineeringUnited KingdomUNIVS FALL (Edinburgh)Tech ElectiveCPS 108Database Systems
2011COMPUTER SCI & ENGRJapanUNIVS ILP YEAR (Tohoku)addt'l basic science courseEARTH 112Dynamics of Earth
2014Electrical EngineeringChinaENGR PEKING SUMMERTECH ELECTIVEENGR104Smart Materials
2014Electrical EngineeringTaiwanLAB RESEARCH NTU SUMMERSpecialization List Req (Systems&Sigs)ENGR 186SLab Research
2013ELECTRICAL ENGRHong Kong HKUST YEARSpecialization Elective (Systems&Sigs)EE 22Electro-Robot Design
2011ENVIRONMENTAL ENGRHong Kong HKU SPRINGEngrCEE 130 AND 130LCIVE 129Geotechnical Engr
2011ENVIRONMENTAL ENGRHong Kong HKU SPRINGEngrCEE 110CIVE 128Civil Engr Mgmt
2011ENVIRONMENTAL ENGRHong Kong HKU SPRING1 course in Waste Water MgmtENGR 100Engr Water&Air Quality
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Fall Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWMAE115 Applied Engineering Thermodynamics.Application of thermodynamic principles to compressible and incompressible processes representative of practical engineering problems; power cycles, refrigeration cycles, multicomponent mixtures, air conditioning systems, combustion, and compressible flow. Design of a thermodynamic processMECH9761Automobile Engine TechnologyThis course introduces the fundamentals of how the design and operation of automobile engines affect their performance and environmental impact. The fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, and fuel properties are studied with reference to engine power, efficiency, and pollutant formation. Students examine the design features and operating characteristics of different types of automobile engines: conventional gasoline, diesel engines, and the next-generation combustion engines including direct-injection (DI), low-temperature-combustion (LTC) diesel, homogeneous-charge compression-ignition (HCCI) engines. The key features of alternative fuel, hybrid, and fuel-cell powered engines are also discussed. The course includes a term project of literature review and presentation performed by 3~4 students as a project team. This is a postgraduate course; however, it is also available to undergraduate students as a technical elective.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/courses/2017/MECH9761.html
Mechanical Engineering4th. Not possible?1stAustraliaUNSWMAE 170 Introduction to Control SystemsFeedback control systems. Modeling, stability, and systems specifications. Root locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods of analysis and design.MMAN3200Linear Systems and ControlModels of physical systems: differential equations for physical systems including mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, thermal and pneumatic systems; linearisation. System analysis techniques: solution by Laplace transform method. Transfer functions and block diagrams. System response: response of first and second order systems to impulse step, ramp and periodic inputs; higher order system response; concept of system stability, applications. Concept of control. Stability criteria; use of Root Locus and Bode for system analysis and modification. Simulation of linear and non-linear systems. The matrix exponential and state space notation. The transfer matrix. Pole and state feedback, controllability and observability. Use of MATLAB as a simulation environment.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/MMAN3200.html Not possible bc of senior design
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Winter Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWMAE 156 Mechanical Behavior and Design PrinciplesPrinciples governing structure and mechanical behavior of materials, relationship relating microstructure and mechanical response with application to elasticity, plasticity, yielding, necking, creep, and fracture of materials. Introduction to experimental techniques to characterize the properties of materials. Design parameters.MMAN3400Mechanics of Solids 2 Membrane stresses in axisymmetric shells, simple bending, bending of composite and reinforced concrete beams, principal and cross moments of area, unsymmetrical bending, transverse shear stresses in beams, shear centre, column buckling, theory of elasticity: compatibility – equilibrium – constitutive equations – plane stress/strain, st Venant’s principal, application of theory of elasticity to axisymmetric problems, torsion of prismatic bars, Prandtl’s membrane analogy, torsion of multiply connected thin-walled sections, deflection analysis based on the principle of virtual work, various modes of fracture, crack-tip stresses, stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, crack growth due to fatigue.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/MMAN3400.html Note to students. Students who deicde to study abroad during the winter and spring quarter WILL have to take MAE 106 senior year. Unless he or she finds a suitable replacement for credit. Also note that because you are only taking 4 classes in a semester, you will have to take summer classes(MAE130B, MAE 156, MAE120 are aviailbe during the summer) or during senior year. Not very possible since most engineer classe are offered at UNSW are Aug-December
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Fall Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWMAE 150 Mechanics of StructuresStresses and strains. Torsion. Bending. Beam deflection. Shear force and moment distributions in beams. Yielding and buckling of columns. Combined loading. Transformation of stresses and strain. Yielding criteria. Finite elements analysis of frames. Dynamic of two-bar truss.MMAN 2400 Mechanics of SolidsThis is the fundamental engineering course for mechanical engineers, with content as follows: Stress, strain. tension/compression test, stress/strain diagram and relationships, Hooke's law, strain energy, Poisson's ratio. shear stress/strain diagram, failure due to creep and fatigue, axial (thermal) stress/strain, geometrical properties of plane figures & second moment of area, simple bending stress, deflections in beams, torsion of circular shafts, helical springs, statically determinate/indeterminate systems, introduction to finite elements, combined stresses, membrane stresses in thin cylindrical and spherical pressure vessels, stress/strain variation at a point in 2D (Mohr's circle), stress variation in 3D.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/MMAN2400.html This does not satisfy MAE 150L. MAE150 L is offered in the summer or you can take it next year
November 26, 2016Mechanical EngineeringAustraliaUni. of MelbourneMAE 130A Fluid DynamicsMCEN90008 Fluid Dynamics
Mechanical Engineering3rd and 4th Year2ndAustraliaUNSWMAE 117 Solar and Renewable Energy System(Technical MAE Elective)Basic principles, design, and operation of solar and other renewable energy systems including solar photo-voltaic, solar thermal, wind, and PEM fuel cell. Includes power generation and storage, and renewable fuels for transportation and stationary power generation.SOLA 2540 Applied Photovolatics Photovoltaic (PV) devices convert sunlight directly to electricity with low levels of greenhouse gas emissions per kWh of electricity produced. This course covers factors important to the operation, design and construction of solar cells and PV system design. Students will learn principle of operation of solar cells, loss mechanisms and design features to improve efficiency of solar cells and modules. In addition, students are introduced to application and design of PV systems. System design is focused on stand-alone PV systems but other specific applications such as Remote Area Power Supply systems and Grid-Connected PV systems are also discussed. Importantly, simulation and laboratory exercises are used to reinforce an understanding of modelling and characterisation of solar cells and PV modules.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2015/SOLA2540.html This can fulfill your technical elective
November 26, 2016Mechanical EngineeringAustraliaUni. of MelbourneMAE 115 Applied Engineering ThermodynamicsMCEN90015Thermodynamics
Mechanical Engineering2nd Year (Spring Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRMAE 91. Introduction to Thermodynamics.Thermodynamic principles; open and closed systems representative of engineering problems. First and second law of thermodynamics with applications to engineering systems and design. Course may be offered online.MMAN 2700Thermodynamics Thermodynamic concepts, systems, property, state, path, process. Work and heat. Properties of pure substances, tables of properties and equations of state. First law of thermodynamics. Analysis of closed and open systems. Second law of thermodynamics, Carnot cycle, Clausius inequality, entropy, irreversibility, isentropic efficiencies. Air-standard cycles. Vapour cycles.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2017/MMAN2700.html
Mechanical Engineering1st and 2ndAustraliaUni. of MelbourneENGRMAE 170. Introduction to Control Systems.Feedback control systems. Modeling, stability, and systems specifications. Root locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods of analysis and design.ELEN90055 Control SystemsThis subject provides an introduction to automatic control systems, with an emphasis on classical techniques for the analysis and design of feedback interconnections. The main challenge in automatic control is to achieve desired performance in the presence of uncertainty about the system dynamics and the operating environment. Feedback control is one way to deal with modelling uncertainty in the design of engineering systems. This subject is a core requirement in the Master of Engineering (Electrical, Electrical with Business, Mechanical, Mechanical with Business and Mechatronics).https://handbook.unimelb.edu.au/view/2017/ELEN90055
Mechanical Engineering1st Semester = Winter and Spring QuarterAustraliaUNSWENGRMAE 170. Introduction to Control SystemsFeedback control systems. Modeling, stability, and systems specifications. Root locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods of analysis and design.MMAN3200Linear Systems and ControlsModels of physical systems: differential equations for physical systems including mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, thermal and pneumatic systems; linearisation. System analysis techniques: solution by Laplace transform method. Transfer functions and block diagrams. System response: response of first and second order systems to impulse step, ramp and periodic inputs; higher order system response; concept of system stability, applications. Concept of control. Stability criteria; use of Root Locus and Bode for system analysis and modification. Simulation of linear and non-linear systems. The matrix exponential and state space notation. The transfer matrix. Pole and state feedback, controllability and observability. Use of MATLAB as a simulation environment.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2017/MMAN3200.html
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Winter Quarter)1stAustraliaUNSWENGRMAE 147. VibrationsAnalysis of structural vibrations of mechanical systems. Modeling for lumped and distributed parameter systems. Topics include single and multi-degree of freedom systems, free and forced vibrations, Fourier series, convolution integral, mass/stiffness matrices, and normal modes with design project.MECH4305Fundamental and Advanced Vibration AnalysisFree and forced responses of single degree-of-freedom spring-mass-damper systems, vibration isolation, transmissibility; Harmonic analysis; Vibration measuring instruments; Linear vibrations of multi-degree-of-freedom systems, normal modes; Analysis of continuous systems, wave equation, transverse vibration of strings, longitudinal/torsional vibration of bars and rods, bending vibration of beams. Introduction to experimental vibration analysis using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. Typical sources of vibration in machines. Analysis of continuous systems using finite element techniques. Modal analysis. Vibration testing.
http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2017/MECH4305.html
Mechanical Engineering1st and 2ndAustraliaUni. of MelbourneENGRMAE 115 Applied Engineering Thermodynamics AND MAE120 Heat TransferApplication of thermodynamic principles to compressible and incompressible processes representative of practical engineering problems; power cycles, refrigeration cycles, multicomponent mixtures, air conditioning systems, combustion, and compressible flow. Design of a thermodynamic processMCEN90015 Thermodynamics There are 2 related, major topics of study in this subject. Each of these topics will analyse aspects of important thermodynamic devices and will then be integrated to analyse their combined effects in selected devices:https://handbook.unimelb.edu.au/view/2017/MCEN90015
Mechanical Engineering1st Semester = Winter and Spring QuarterAustraliaUNSWENGRMAE 112 PropulsionApplication of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics to basic flow processes and cycle performance in propulsion systems: gas turbines, ramjets, scramjets, and rockets.AERO3660 Flight Performance and PropulsionAtmospheric environment. Aircraft performance; speeds, range and endurance. Energy rates of climb. Mission profiles; accelerated and non-accelerated flight; take-off and landing. Introduction to propulsion systems; history, types, basic thrust, efficiency equations, propellers, rotors and fans. Engine intakes.; subsonic, supersonic, scramjets, ramjets, gas turbines, piston engines, design performance. Rockets, noise, pollution. Future propulsion systems.http://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/courses/2017/AERO3660.html
Mechanical Engineering1st Semester = Winter and Spring QuarterAustraliaUni. of MelbourneENGRMAE 107. Fluid Thermal Science Laboratory. Fluid and thermal engineering laboratory. Experimental analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer, and thermodynamic systems. Probability, statistics, and uncertainly analysis. Report writing is emphasized and a design project is required. Materials fee.MCEN 90018 Advanced Fluid Dynamics The study of fluid dynamics is one of the fundamental disciplines in Mechanical Engineering. In the first part of the course, students will learn about boundary-layer theory, which is a key element of aerodynamic design. A guest-lecture series on wind engineering will build on this knowledge to give students a perspective on one of the most important forms of renewable energy in our society today.https://handbook.unimelb.edu.au/view/2017/MCEN90018
November 26, 2016Mechanical EngineeringEngland University College LondonMAE 150 Mechanics of StructuresMECH204PMechanics of Solids and StructuresDoes not receive credit for MAE150 Lab
Mechanical Engineering2nd Year (Spring Quarter)Teaching Block 1: 25 September - 15 December 2017England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGRMAE 91. Introduction to ThermodynamicsThermodynamic principles; open and closed systems representative of engineering problems. First and second law of thermodynamics with applications to engineering systems and design. Course may be offered online.MENG11202Thermodynamics IIntroduces applications first and second laws of thermodynamics to engines, machines and plant components (e.g cylinders and pistons, throttles, turbines, compressors, Otto, Diesel and gas cycles).

Aims:

To provide an understanding of terms (e.g. reversible , control volume , enthalpy ), principles (1st/ 2nd law), and use of principles in analysis of equipment and machines.
http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=MENG11202
Mechanical Engineering2nd Year (Winter Quarter)Teaching Block 1: 25 September - 15 December 2017England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGRMAE 60. Electric CircuitsDesign and analysis of analog circuits based on lumped circuit elements with emphasis on the use of operational amplifiers. Sinusoidal and transient response. Constructional and laboratory testing of analog circuits, and introduction to data acquisition. Materials fee.EENG16200Application of ElectronicsAn introduction to the application of analogue and digital electronic systems for non-electrical engineering students. The aim is to develop students' high-level knowledge and skills to enable them to be effective specifiers and users of analogue and digital subsystems, electrical/electronic sensors and actuators. It also provides a basic understanding of electrical power. The unit consists of lectures, example classes, and labs. Students will gain theoretical as well as hands-on experience of both analogue and digital aspects of electronics.http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=EENG16200 http://www.bristol.ac.uk/university/dates/ http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/RouteStructure.jsa?byCohort=N&cohort=Y&routeLevelCode=1&modeOfStudyCode=Full+Time&ayrCode=16%2F17&programmeCode=4MECH002U
Mechanical Engineering2nd Year (Spring Quarter) and 3rd Year (Spring Quarter)Teaching Block 4 (weeks 1-24) England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGRMAE 52. Computer-Aided Design ENGRMAE 145. Theory of Machines and MechanismsDevelops skills for interpretation and presentation of mechanical design drawings and the use of CAD in engineering design. An integrated approach to drafting based on sketching, manual drawing, and three-dimensional CAD techniques is presented ///////Develops skills for interpretation and presentation of mechanical design drawings and the use of CAD in engineering design. An integrated approach to drafting based on sketching, manual drawing, and three-dimensional CAD techniques is presentedMENG26000Design and Manufacture 2This unit is made up of two parts: CAD and Machine Design

CAD: This unit consists of lectures and design exercises in the computer labs. The lectures will teach the fundamental principles and techniques of CAD and describe how CAD is used in the design process. There will be two coursework projects. One project will involve the design of a car wheel. A second project will involve the design of a steering and suspension assembly for a car. Students will carry out the projects in supervised lab sessions. Students will produce coursework consisting of reports and CAD drawings.

Machine Design: The unit will enable students to develop The skills needed to design machine systems incorporating machine elements. Machine elements will include items such as fasteners, gears, bearings, couplings and seals. There will be two design exercises. The first design exercise will involve students working in pairs. The second design exercise will be more unconstrained and will take place in groups of four.

Aims:

CAD:

To give the students basic competence in using a 3D mechanical CAD package
To give students experience in the three-dimensional packaging of mechanical systems using solid modelling
To give an overview of car suspension technology
Give students CAD skills necessary for third year projects
Machine Design:

Provide foundation knowledge and skills in the selection and design of common machine elements such as fasteners, gears, bearings, couplings and 4-bar mechanisms.
Give experience in constrained machine design.
Give experience in open-ended machine design.
Give experience in working in design teams of two and four.
Increase student awareness of design information in the form of manufacturer’s data sheets and engineering standards.
http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=MENG26000
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Winter Quarter)Teaching Block 4 (weeks 1-24) England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGRMAE 150. Mechanics of Structures. ENGRMAE 156. Mechanical Behavior and Design Principles.MENG21100Materials Engineering 2This course is split into two main sections: properties of materials and mechanics of materials.

Mechanics of Materials: presents the advanced principles of elastic analysis in three dimensions, and applies these concepts to idealised problems based on simple engineering structures. Specific topics covered include

Non-symmetric bending of beams
Thick walled cylinders
Yield criteria
Torsion of non-circular sections
Buckling
Energy methods
Rotational stresses and bending of plates.
Properties of Materials: This section of the course covers three main themes: 1) fatigue analysis and prediction in uncracked bodies, 2) advanced material selection strategies when conflicting objectives are required and 3) the production of metals and their thermomechanical processing. Specific aims of the course are

Demonstrate how basic mechanics and S-N curves can be used to predict fatigue lifetimes in uncracked components.
Develop strategies within the Ashby method for choosing appropriate materials when there are conflicting objectives or multiple coupled constraints.
Show how material structures depend on temperature and how this can be determined from a phase diagram
Demonstrate how the physics of transformations dictates the heat treatments used in industry and how this alters material properties. There is a focus on steel and related engineering alloys.

This course is split into two main sections: properties of materials and mechanics of materials.

Mechanics of Materials: presents the advanced principles of elastic analysis in three dimensions, and applies these concepts to idealised problems based on simple engineering structures. Specific topics covered include

Non-symmetric bending of beams
Thick walled cylinders
Yield criteria
Torsion of non-circular sections
Buckling
Energy methods
Rotational stresses and bending of plates.
Properties of Materials: This section of the course covers three main themes: 1) fatigue analysis and prediction in uncracked bodies, 2) advanced material selection strategies when conflicting objectives are required and 3) the production of metals and their thermomechanical processing. Specific aims of the course are

Demonstrate how basic mechanics and S-N curves can be used to predict fatigue lifetimes in uncracked components.
Develop strategies within the Ashby method for choosing appropriate materials when there are conflicting objectives or multiple coupled constraints.
Show how material structures depend on temperature and how this can be determined from a phase diagram
Demonstrate how the physics of transformations dictates the heat treatments used in industry and how this alters material properties. There is a focus on steel and related engineering alloys.

This course is split into two main sections: properties of materials and mechanics of materials.

Mechanics of Materials: presents the advanced principles of elastic analysis in three dimensions, and applies these concepts to idealised problems based on simple engineering structures. Specific topics covered include

Non-symmetric bending of beams
Thick walled cylinders
Yield criteria
Torsion of non-circular sections
Buckling
Energy methods
Rotational stresses and bending of plates.
Properties of Materials: This section of the course covers three main themes: 1) fatigue analysis and prediction in uncracked bodies, 2) advanced material selection strategies when conflicting objectives are required and 3) the production of metals and their thermomechanical processing. Specific aims of the course are

Demonstrate how basic mechanics and S-N curves can be used to predict fatigue lifetimes in uncracked components.
Develop strategies within the Ashby method for choosing appropriate materials when there are conflicting objectives or multiple coupled constraints.
Show how material structures depend on temperature and how this can be determined from a phase diagram
Demonstrate how the physics of transformations dictates the heat treatments used in industry and how this alters material properties. There is a focus on steel and related engineering alloys.

This course is split into two main sections: properties of materials and mechanics of materials.

Mechanics of Materials: presents the advanced principles of elastic analysis in three dimensions, and applies these concepts to idealised problems based on simple engineering structures. Specific topics covered include

Non-symmetric bending of beams
Thick walled cylinders
Yield criteria
Torsion of non-circular sections
Buckling
Energy methods
Rotational stresses and bending of plates.
Properties of Materials: This section of the course covers three main themes: 1) fatigue analysis and prediction in uncracked bodies, 2) advanced material selection strategies when conflicting objectives are required and 3) the production of metals and their thermomechanical processing. Specific aims of the course are

Demonstrate how basic mechanics and S-N curves can be used to predict fatigue lifetimes in uncracked components.
Develop strategies within the Ashby method for choosing appropriate materials when there are conflicting objectives or multiple coupled constraints.
Show how material structures depend on temperature and how this can be determined from a phase diagram
Demonstrate how the physics of transformations dictates the heat treatments used in industry and how this alters material properties. There is a focus on steel and related engineering alloys.
http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=MENG21100
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Winter Quarter)Teaching Block 4 (weeks 1-24) England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGRMAE 147. Vibrations ENGRMAE 170. Introduction to Control SystemsAnalysis of structural vibrations of mechanical systems. Modeling for lumped and distributed parameter systems. Topics include single and multi-degree of freedom systems, free and forced vibrations, Fourier series, convolution integral, mass/stiffness matrices, and normal modes with design project.MENG22200Dynamics and Control 2 The Systems and Control Engineering course introduces students to the basic methods of Automatic Control engineering, i.e. for continuous-time single-input/single-output linear systems, and to the methods of modelling associated plant dynamics. The Vibrations course is designed to teach basic vibration phenomena, such as how vibration is caused, how it is measured, and what its consequences are. The single degree of freedom mass-spring-damper system is analysed, both in free vibration and with various forms of excitation. The importance of resonance and force transmission is stressed. Students should gain an understanding of natural frequencies and how these relate to free and forced vibration, together with vibration transmission. They will also learn about multi-degree of freedom systems in free and forced vibration and how to apply numerical methods of solution. The laboratory class illustrates aspects of the course, especially resonance and damping and the behaviour of systems with two degrees of freedom.

Aims:

Systems & Control Engineering:

To introduce students to the basic methodologies of modelling dynamic systems and controlling them.

Vibrations:

This course is designed to teach basic vibration phenomena, such as how vibration is caused, how it is measured, and what its consequences are. The single degree of freedom mass-spring-damper system is analysed, both in free vibration and with various forms of excitation. The importance of resonance and force transmission is stressed. The laboratory class illustrates aspects of the course, especially resonance and damping, and the behaviour of systems with two degrees of freedom.
http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=MENG22200
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Fall Quarter)Teaching Block 1 (weeks 1 - 12) England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGRCEE 171. Water Resources EngineeringPrinciples governing the analysis and design of water resource systems including pressurized pipelines, pipe networks, channels, and ground water. Coverage of fluid mass, momentum and energy conservation, flow resistance, and related laboratory measurements in different systems. Materials fee.CENG21300 Hydraulics 2This unit consists of the following elements: Engineering Hydrology 2 - to give students a thorough grounding in the principles and practice of engineering hydrology and water resources; Open Channel Flow 2 - to give students a thorough grounding in open channel flow, hydraulic models and river engineering.http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=CENG21300
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Fall Quarter)Teaching Block 4 (weeks 1-24) England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGRCEE 170. Introduction to Fluid MechanicsThermodynamic and mechanical fluid properties; fluid statics; control volume and differential approaches for mass, momentum, and energy; dimensional analysis and similarity.CENG10006Mechanics of Fluids and StructuresThere are certain basic structural mechanics concepts like units and dimensional analysis, centre of gravity and moments of inertia of objects, force and moments, vectors, equilibrium and stability, pressures which Civil Engineers must have at their fingertips. One of the aims of this unit is to make sure you have these.

In addition, the students should: learn the behaviour of fluids; be aware of the different ways of tackling a fluid mechanics problem, i.e. the place of theory, experiment, numerical modelling and dimensional analysis; be able to solve problems in hydrostatics, use principles of conservation to solve simple fluid dynamics, and use principles of similarity to explain fluid mechanics problems. To give students a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of Fluid Mechanics as a pre-requisite for other advanced courses in open channel hydraulics, water and environmental engineering, hydraulic structures, and flood risk management.
http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=CENG10006
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Fall Quarter)Teaching Block 4 (weeks 1-24) England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGRCEE 130. Soil MechanicsMechanics of soils, composition and classification of soils, compaction, compressibility and consolidation, shear strength, seepage, bearing capacity, lateral earth pressure, retaining walls, piles.CENG20007Applied Soil Mechanics 2To enable students to gain a sound grasp of the fundamentals of soil material behaviour. To introduce students to some methods of Geotechnical Analysis.http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=CENG20007
Mechanical Engineering2nd Year (Winter Quarter)Teaching Block 4 (weeks 1-24) England United Kingdom(Bristol)ENGR 54. Principles of Materials Science and EngineeringSuperconductors to biodegradable polymers. Structure and properties of materials, including metal, ceramics, polymers, semiconductors, composites, traditional materials. Atomic structure, bonding, defects, phase equilibria, mechanical properties, electrical, optical and magnetic properties. Introduction to materials processing and synthesis. Course may be offered online. Materials fee.MENG11100Materials 1This course is split into two main sections: properties of materials and mechanics of materials.

Properties of materials is concerned with the fundamentals of material behaviour with an emphasis on how they behave under loading and the origin of this behaviour. There are four main themes: 1) the definitions of common mechanical properties; 2) the selection of suitable materials using property databases; 3) the structure and deformation of crystalline materials; 4) the properties and structure of polymers and hybrid/composite materials. The aims of this section are:

Provide specific meanings of material properties important to engineers and how these link to key concepts in the structure materials
Introduce the basic concepts behind rational material selection
Explain common strengthening mechanisms with their advantages and disadvantages
Mechanics of materials is concerned with the mathematical description of stress and strain and how these concepts can be used to solve common engineering problems. The aims of this section are:

To acquire an absolute minimum of solid mechanics knowledge required to study more advanced concepts in years 2 and above
Introduce key concepts including stress and strain tensors, stress equilibrium, solutions of simple 1D and 2D stress problems, principal values and directions, tensor rotations.
Explain how to use these concepts to solve common linear elastic problems such as statically indeterminate systems, slender beam bending theory, and buckling
http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=MENG11100
Mechanical Engineering3rd and 4th YearTeaching Block 4 (weeks 1-24) England United Kingdom(Bristol)(Technical MAE Elective)MENG21712Modelling 2Computing-based Modelling:

During the first seven laboratory sessions, students will be required to undertake a computer-based project, during which they will develop a model of a either an engineering/scientific or rules based system in the Matlab environment. Examples of these have included: stream functions, the diffusion of ideal gases, parametric models or the development of a chess engine. Supporting notes are provided. These projects will be assessed during the eighth session. During the final laboratory, students will be given a brief overview of the Simulink package.


Physical Modelling:

This part of the unit will enable students to model and physically realise engineering systems, evaluate design alternatives, manufacture working prototypes and assess their performance. This is achieved through specific application to an engines laboratory, design and build of an amphibious vehicle and the build phase of a vending machine.
Aims:

Computing-based Modelling:


To extend the students knowledge of scientific computing via Matlab and Simulink. To increase their ability and confidence in the development of programs to model physical systems.

Physical Modelling:

To provide students with foundation skills in developing (conceiving, designing and building) engineering systems to meet a specification and analysing performance for existing systems and critically appraising their performance through presentations, demonstrations and written reports. These activities together broaden the students understanding of the design, development and test process, and in particular, provide hands-on experience to realise their designs.
http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/UnitDetails.jsa?ayrCode=16%2F17&unitCode=MENG21712
2010Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKU FALLTech ElectiveME 121Engineer Mechanics
2015Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKU FALLmechanical engr core coursesME 111Mechanics of Fluids
2015Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKU FALLMath 2EMath 10Multivariable Calculus
2012Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKUST YEAREngrMAE 91ME 31Thermodynamics
2015Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKU FALLEngrMAE 52ME 15Drawing & Design
2012Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKUST YEAREngrMAE 30CIVE 104Stats& Dynamics
2015Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKU FALLEngrMAE 150 (and150L?)ME 115YMechanics of Solids
2015Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKU FALLEngr 54ENGR 25Properties/Materials
2015Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong HKUST YEAREcon 23ECON 13Microecon
November 26, 2016Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong Uni. Of Hong KongMAE 130A Fluid DynamicsMECH 3408
November 26, 2016Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong Uni. Of Hong KongMAE 115 Applied Engineering ThermodynamicsMECH 3402
Mechanical Engineering2nd Year (Spring Quarter)2ndHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 91. Introduction to Thermodynamics.Thermodynamic principles; open and closed systems representative of engineering problems. First and second law of thermodynamics with applications to engineering systems and design. Course may be offered online.MECH2414ThermofluidsThermofluids is a branch of science and engineering, covering topics in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. These topics form the basic foundations that govern processes in engineering applications. This course is an introduction to the thermofluids and how the principles can be applied to understand/design thermal and fluid flow processes. The specific course objectives are: (1) understand and apply thermodynamic principles to engineering applications; (2) understand basic concepts and fundamental equations in fluid mechanics, and develop skills to solve practical flow problems; and (3) form a foundation for subsequent studies in engineering thermodynamics, building services, material science, heat transfer,marine engineering, environmental engineering, power engineering, energy conversion, energy system and other areas. At the end of this course, students who fulfill the requirements of this course will be able to: (1) identify, formulate and solve thermofluids engineering problems; and (2) design and conduct experiments in thermofluids engineering, as well as to analyse and interpret data. Topics include: concepts and definitions; properties of pure substance; heat and work; first law of thermodynamics; second law of thermodynamics; entropy; basic concepts on fluids and flows; dimensional analysis; similarity and modelling; momentum theorems and pipe flow analysis.Assessment: 10% practical work, 10% continuous assessment, 80% examinationhttp://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-ME-14-15-4Y.pdf
Mechanical Engineering2rd Year (Spring Quarter)1stHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 52. Computer-Aided Design. Develops skills for interpretation and presentation of mechanical design drawings and the use of CAD in engineering design. An integrated approach to drafting based on sketching, manual drawing, and three-dimensional CAD techniques is presented.MECH2404 DRAWING AND ELEMENTS OF DESIGN This course covers the basic knowledge of engineering drawing techniques and the basic concepts in product design. It introduces standard engineering drawing methods including orthographic and pictorial projections, dimensioning and tolerancing, limits and fits. Topics: features, functionality and representation method for screws, fasteners, cam and gear; computer aided drafting with 3D CAD modeling which allows estimation studying, computer photo and animation for advertising and technical manuals; and basic concepts of different manufacturing processes to ensure the manufacturability of product. https://myeap.eap.ucop.edu/Galileo/service/coursecatalog/CoursePublic.aspx?IDs=74818&ParticipationID=V8K4e1%2fa7gI%3d
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Winter Quarter)2ndHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 156. Mechanical Behavior and Design PrinciplesPrinciples governing structure and mechanical behavior of materials, relationship relating microstructure and mechanical response with application to elasticity, plasticity, yielding, necking, creep, and fracture of materials. Introduction to experimental techniques to characterize the properties of materials. Design parameters.MECH3409 MECHANICS OF SOLIDS This course introduces the theory of elasticity for stress/strain analysis and high-lights the limitations of the elementary strength of materials approach; and introduces alternate approaches for stress/strain analysis based on the numerical techniques. The course covers how to apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering relevant to the elementary strength of materials analysis; how to identify, formulate and solve various 2-D elastic problems by employing stress/displacement functions; and how to use some of the computer/IT tools relevant to numerical stress analysis with an understanding of their processes and limitations. Assessment: practical work, continuous assessment, final exam. https://myeap.eap.ucop.edu/Galileo/service/coursecatalog/CoursePublic.aspx?IDs=74817&ParticipationID=V8K4e1%2fa7gI%3d
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Winter Quarter)2ndHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 147. Vibrations. Analysis of structural vibrations of mechanical systems. Modeling for lumped and distributed parameter systems. Topics include single and multi-degree of freedom systems, free and forced vibrations, Fourier series, convolution integral, mass/stiffness matrices, and normal modes with design project. Mech3418Dynamics and ControlThis course provides comprehensive knowledge in advanced areas of rigid-body dynamics, theory of vibration for different types of mechanical system, dynamic system analysis techniques, basic closed-loop control system design techniques, with application to mechanical and other control systems. Topics: Advanced rotational motion; balancing of rotating and reciprocating masses; forced vibration of single degree of freedom systems; vibration measurement, isolation and control; torsional vibration of multi-rotor systems; free transverse vibration of shafts; modelling of physical systems; time response analysis of dynamical systems; feedback control systems; control system design and applications; stability; root locus method. Assessment: practical work, continuous assessment, final exam. http://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-ME-14-15-4Y.pdf
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Fall Quarter)1stHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 130A. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics.Fundamental concepts; fluid statics; fluid dynamics; Bernoulli's equation; control-volume analysis; basic flow equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; differential analysis; potential flow; viscous incompressible flow.MECH3408MECHANICS OF FLUIDS This course aims to: (1) provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of the following areas of fluid mechanics: kinematics, Navier-Stokes equations, differential analysis of flows in channels and pipes, boundary layer flows, potential flows, dimensional analysis, and (2) equip students with capability of applying basic fluid mechanics principles in engineering designs.Topics include: Navier-Stokes equations; pipe and channel viscous flows; lubrication; two-dimensional potential flows; boundary layer flows; dimensional analysis.Assessment: 10% practical work, 10% continuous assessment, 80% examinationhttp://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-ME-14-15-4Y.pdf MUST TAKE THIS CLASS BC IT IS A PREREQ
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Spring Quarter)1stHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 120. Heat and Mass TransferFundamentals of heat and mass transfer. Conduction, heat and mass transfer by convection in laminar and turbulent flows, radiation heat transfer, and combined modes of heat and mass transfer. Practical engineering applications.MECH 4411Heat Transfer This course is on the fundamental principles of heat transfer, covering heat conduction, heat convection and heat exchangers. The course objectives are: (1) to provide an understanding of fundamental principles of heat transfer; and (2) to enable students to use the fundamental principles for conducting thermal analysis and design of engineering problems. At the end of this course, students who fulfill the requirements of this course will be able to: (1) demonstrate an understanding of the principles that govern heat transfer processes; (2) analyze heat-transfer problems quantitatively; and (3) identify relevant engineering solutions in thermal systems.Topics include: Fourier’s law; heat-conduction equation; thermal conductivity; conduction; fins; basic convection principles; laminar and turbulent heat transfer in tubes and over plates; Reynolds analogy; types of heat exchangers; overall heat-transfer coefficient; log mean temperature difference; effectiveness-NTU method; heat exchanger design. Assessment: 10% practical work, 10% continuous assessment, 80% examination http://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-ME-14-15-4Y.pdf
Mechanical Engineering3rd and 4th Year2ndHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 172. Design of Computer-Controlled Robots(technical elective)Students design a small robotic device and program it to exhibit sentient behaviors. The basic aspects of mechatronic design are covered, including motor and sensor selection, control strategies, and microcomputer programming for the implementation of control paradigms.MECH4423 BUILDING ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL SYSTEMS The course covers the fundamental principles, applications and future development potentials of energy mangagment control systems (EMCS) which have become indispensable for modern buildings. The students have the opportunity to perform laboratory experiments or to undertake mini-projects to better understand the application of knowledge acquired. The students will be able to apply the knowledge acquired to the specification, selection and system enhancement of building EMCS. Topics: the basic concepts of computer-based integrated monitoring, control and energy management for building services installations; the principles of design and operation of building energy management and control systems (EMCS) and their applications to modern buildings; and modern methods of performance analysis of building services systems using building EMCS. Assessment: Exam (70%), practical work (10%), continuous assessment (20%). Main reference: Honeywell, 1997. Engineering Manual of Automatic Control for Commercial Buildings - Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning, SI Edition., Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, MN. [PDF] http://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-ME-14-15-4Y.pdf
Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong Hong Kong University of Science and TechnologyENGRMAE 170. Introduction to Control Systems.Feedback control systems. Modeling, stability, and systems specifications. Root locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods of analysis and design.MECH 3610Control Principles[Previous Course Code(s): MECH 2610] Introduction to system equations, block diagrams, signal flow graphs, state-space systems, transient response using convolution integral, root locus and frequency response methods. Design by root locus, frequency response and state space method. Nyquist stability test. Exclusion(s): ELEC 3200
Mechanical Engineering3rd and 4th Year1stHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 118. Sustainable Energy Systems (Technical MAE Elective)Basic principles, design, and operation of sustainable energy systems including wind, solar photo-voltaic and thermal, hydroelectric, geothermal, oceanic, biomass combustion, advanced coal, and next generation nuclear. Includes power generation, storage, and transmission for stationary power generation.MECH4409ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS Course topics include: introduction to energy technology; energy chains; conventional, renewable and alternative sources of energy; energy demand, energy consumption trends, energy conversion and management; Fossil fuel-fired steam power plants; steam generators; boiler development; boiler circulation; furnace construction and operation; pulverized coal firing; oil and gas firing; furnace heat transfer; boiler performance; gas turbine/steam combined-cycle power plants; industrial power plants; solar thermal power plants; solar thermal collectors design; paraboloidal dish collectors; heliostats; solar distributed collector thermal power plant; solar pond; Solar photovoltaic systems; prospects of PV system; efficiency of a solar cell; PV cell technology; different generations of PV; manufacturing process of PV; solar PV power plant; wind to electric energy conversion systems; wind energy quantum; forces on the blades of a propeller; types of wind energy systems; wind to electric energy conversion systems; wind turbine generator with diesel generator; nuclear energy and power plants; energy from nuclear fission reactions; nuclear reactor plant; fast breeder reactions; boiling water reactor gas cooled reactor; nuclear waste management; bio fuel and urban waste to energy; bio fuel processing; applications of bio fuel; urban solid waste; waste incineration process waste incineration energy plant; landfill processes and sites in Hong Kong; and application of landfill gas. https://myeap.eap.ucop.edu/Galileo/service/coursecatalog/CoursePublic.aspx?IDs=59020&ParticipationID=V8K4e1%2fa7gI%3d
Mechanical Engineering3rd Year (Fall Quarter)1stHong Kong HKUENGRMAE 115. Applied Engineering Thermodynamics.Application of thermodynamic principles to compressible and incompressible processes representative of practical engineering problems; power cycles, refrigeration cycles, multicomponent mixtures, air conditioning systems, combustion, and compressible flow. Design of a thermodynamic process. MECH3402ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS Engineering Thermodynamics is a branch of science and engineering, covering topics in power cycles, air-conditioning, heat transfer, and combustion. The course objectives are to: (1) provide students with fundamental principles of the latest technologies of thermodynamics from a mechanical engineering perspective, and (2) enable students to apply and practice the knowledge in relevant industry and profession, such as power generation, automotive, and building services, etc. At the end of this course, students who fulfill the course requirements will be able to: (1) apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering appropriate to thermodynamics, (2) identify, formulate, and solve engineering thermodynamics problems, and (3) design and conduct experiments in engineering thermodynamics, as well as to analyse and interpret data.Topics include: IC engines; steam and gas power plants; refrigeration; jet propulsion; gas mixture; psychrometry and air-conditioning; introduction to heat transfer and combustion.Assessment: 10% practical work, 10% continuous assessment, 80% examinationhttp://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-ME-14-15-4Y.pdf
Mechanical EngineeringHong Kong Hong Kong University of Science and TechnologyENGRMAE 107. Fluid Thermal Science Laboratory.Fluid and thermal engineering laboratory. Experimental analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer, and thermodynamic systems. Probability, statistics, and uncertainly analysis. Report writing is emphasized and a design project is required. Materials fee.http://prog-crs.ust.hk/ugcourse
Mechanical Engineering2nd Year (Spring Quarter)1stHong Kong HKUENGR 54. Principles of Materials Science and EngineeringSuperconductors to biodegradable polymers. Structure and properties of materials, including metal, ceramics, polymers, semiconductors, composites, traditional materials. Atomic structure, bonding, defects, phase equilibria, mechanical properties, electrical, optical and magnetic properties. Introduction to materials processing and synthesis. Course may be offered online. Materials fee.MECH2419 PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS This course introduces the underlying scientific principles of the mechanical engineering behavior of metals, and in particular to emphasise the effects of stress and heat via their influence on the microstructure of the materials. The behavior of materials in service conditions including stress and corrosion effects will be highlighted. The course concerns those principles governing the crystalline state, which is appropriate to metals and ceramics, as well as the amorphous and semi-crystalline states, which are relevant to polymers. Topics include: elements of atomic structure and bonding; crystal structure; structure of polymers; solidification and phase diagrams; defects and plastic deformation in the crystalline state; TTT diagrams and heat treatment of steels; metallurgy of fatigue; corrosion resistance and surface treatment; mechanical properties of plastics. Assessment: practical work, continuous assessment, final exam. https://myeap.eap.ucop.edu/Galileo/service/coursecatalog/CoursePublic.aspx?IDs=74820&ParticipationID=V8K4e1%2fa7gI%3d chrome-extension://oemmndcbldboiebfnladdacbdfmadadm/http://engg.hku.hk/home/syllabuses/Syllabuses-ME-12-13-4Y.pdf http://me.hku.hk/index.php?tpl=essay&id=128
Mechanical Engineering3rd and 4th Year2ndHong Kong HKU(Technical MAE Elective)ENGRMAE 159. Aircraft DesignPreliminary design of subsonic general aviation and transport aircraft with emphasis on layout, aerodynamic design, propulsion, and performance. Estimation of total weight and weight distribution, design of wings, fuselage, and tail, selection and location of engines, prediction of overall performance.MECH3416FUNDAMENTALS OF AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING Topics: Thermodynamics of turbo-jet and turbo-fan engines; propulsion efficiency and specific fuel consumption; engine selection; environmental impact of aviation. History and development of aerodynamics; physics of flow around airfoils; lift, drag; compressible flow through nozzles; Drag polar; flight dynamics; take-off and landing performance; optimal cruise speed and altitude; Classification of aircraft systems; flight control surfaces and systems including engine and landing gears; aircraft environment; fuselage structure and construction; Stress intensity factor; Fatigue-crack growth prediction; inspection techniques; non-destructive testing for damage identification and crack monitoring; Probability of found and damage tolerance; abnormal events; maintenance practices; Strength-to-density considerations; typical material applications in airframes; metallic materials: processing and properties of aluminium alloys, titanium alloys and steels; fibrereinforced laminates: fibre and matrix materials, manufacturing processes, classical lamination theory (CLT), failure modes; Material service conditions in aero-turbines; oxidation; linear and power-law creep: Herring-Nabarro, Coble, and dislocation mechanisms; nickel based superalloys; turbine blade design; turbine blade coatings. Experiments: Tensile properties of Al alloys and steels for studying strength-to-density considerations https://myeap.eap.ucop.edu/Galileo/service/coursecatalog/CoursePublic.aspx?IDs=48776&ParticipationID=V8K4e1%2fa7gI%3d
Mechanical Engineering3rd and 4th Year1stHong Kong HKU(Technical MAE Elective)MECH3420 Air Pollution control This course provides a basic understanding of the principles and techniques related to the formation, dispersion and control of various air pollutants formed from anthropogenic pollution sources; and presents how to assess common air pollution source emissions and suggest remedial solutions to polluting sources. Assessment: assignmentm midterm test, final exam. References 1. Introduction to environmental engineering and science, by Gilbert M. Masters, Prentice Hall. 1991. 2. Prediction of the dispersion of airborne effluents, 3rd Ed., by J.R. Martin, Meteorological Evaluation Services, Inc. ASME, 1979. 3. Atmospheric chemistry and physics of air pollution by J.H. Seinfeld, Wiley - Interscience, 1986. 4. Air Pollution Control Equipment V1 Particulates, by L. Theodore & A.J. Buonicore, CRC Press 1988. 5. Air Pollution Control Equipment V2 Air Pollutants, by L. Theodore & A.J. Buonicore, Prentice Hall 1982. 6. Air Pollution Control Theory, by M. Crawford, McGraw Hill 1976. 7. Process Engineering & Design for Air Pollution Control by J. Benitez, Prentice Hall, 1993. 8. Aerosol Science & Technology by P.C. Reist, McGraw-Hill, 1993. https://myeap.eap.ucop.edu/Galileo/service/coursecatalog/CoursePublic.aspx?IDs=77748&ParticipationID=V8K4e1%2fa7gI%3d
Mechanical Engineering3rd and 4th YearHong Kong HKU(Technical MAE Elective)ELEC3104 Electrical Vehical Technology This course provides sound understanding of various electric vehicle (EV) technologies. The emphasis is on five key areas of EVs – System integration, propulsion systems, energy sources, auxiliaries and impacts. Specifically, the course covers the following topics: system integration including battery EVs, hybrid EVs and fuel cell EVs; propulsion systems including single-motor and multiple-motor drives, geared and gearless in-wheel motors and hybrid powertrains; energy sources including batteries, fuel cells, ultracapacitors and ultrahigh-speed flywheels; auxiliaries including battery chargers and indicators, temperature control units, power steering units, auxiliary power supplies and regenerative braking units; impacts including power system, environment and economy. https://myeap.eap.ucop.edu/Galileo/service/coursecatalog/CoursePublic.aspx?IDs=56765&ParticipationID=V8K4e1%2fa7gI%3d
Mechanical Engineering1st(Aug-December)IrelandUni. College DublinTechnical ElectiveMEEN 40090 Energy Systems and Climate ChangeEnergy systems drive all economies; provide essential heating, cooling, and desalination services; and underpin services in medicine, education, transport, communications and many other areas. To date, and for the foreseeable future, the vast majority of the energy supply has, and will continue to, come from fossil fuels. However, unprecedented growth in global population and economic development has led to an exponential growth in energy demand. The finite nature of the fossil-fuel resource, coupled with growing awareness of the impact their consumption has on the global environment, presents a practical and ethical dilemna: how can current and future energy demands be met in an equitable and sustainable manner? https://sisweb.ucd.ie/usis/w_
Mechanical Engineering1st(Aug-December)IrelandUni. College DublinENGRMAE 170. Introduction to Control Systems. Feedback control systems. Modeling, stability, and systems specifications. Root locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods of analysis and design.EEEN40010Control Theory Systems do not in general naturally behave in a manner which accords with the user’s wishes. Systems must in general be extended by the addition of a controller in order to force them to behave in an acceptable fashion. The controller may be a human (as in the case of the driver of a car for example), but the controller may also be a human-designed engineering system in its own right. In the latter case the controller is called an automatic controller. This module addresses the need for, the value of and the design of automatic controllers for some of the most common classes of engineering systems. Automatic controllers appear in more or less every engineering environment, from automotive/aerospace to biomedical equipment and including almost everything in between.https://sisweb.ucd.ie/usis/w_sm
Mechanical Engineering2nd(Jan-June)IrelandUni. College DublinENGRMAE 170. Introduction to Control Systems. Feedback control systems. Modeling, stability, and systems specifications. Root locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods of analysis and design.CHEN30140Process Instrumentation and Control This module will introduce students to a variety of process control strategies including feedback, cascade, feedforward and ratio control. The methods required for linear systems analysis, in particular, will be covered in detail (transfer functions, characteristic equations, root locus, Routh stability test, and frequency response). Controller tuning and synthesis will be introduced and the students will develop skills needed to solve problems involved in chemical and mechanical engineering process control. Particular emphasis will be directed towards placing process control within the context of impact on a control system design's safety, maintenance, sustainability and legal/regulatory impact. Generalising the analytical skills developed in this course to be transferred to other engineering situations is also an important, embedded aspect.https://sisweb.ucd.ie/usis/w_sm_web
Mechanical Engineering1st(Aug-December)IrelandUni. College DublinENGRMAE 115 Applied Engineering ThermodynamicsApplication of thermodynamic principles to compressible and incompressible processes representative of practical engineering problems; power cycles, refrigeration cycles, multicomponent mixtures, air conditioning systems, combustion, and compressible flow. Design of a thermodynamic process.MEEN30100Engineering Thermodynamics 2https://sisweb.ucd.ie/usis/w_sm_
Mechanical Engineering2nd(Jan-June)IrelandUni. College DublinENGRMAE 107. Fluid Thermal Science LaboratoryFluid and thermal engineering laboratory. Experimental analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer, and thermodynamic systems. Probability, statistics, and uncertainly analysis. Report writing is emphasized and a design project is required. Materials fee.MEEN 30040Measurement and InstrumentationIntroduction to the fundamental principles associated with measurement and instrumentation. General instrument characteristics, calibration, measurement uncertainty, error specification and propogation, transient characteristics. Analysis of measurement systems to include: Temperature - thermocouples, thermistors, platinum resistance thermometers. Flow - Velocity measurement, pitot tube, hot wire anemometer. Volumetric measurement, obstruction flowmeters, rotometer, flowmeters. Strain. Force & pressure. load Cells, pressure gauges (mechanical and electronic). Signal conditioning, electrical signals, transducer circuits, signal transportation. Signal processing. Data acquisition sampling, multiplexing, analogue to digital conversion, scaling up. Introduction, Graphical data presentation. Data analysis and optimization. Regression analysis, correlation, goodness of fit, model building. Design of experiments and analysis of designed experiments.https://sisweb.ucd.ie/usis/w_sm_web
2015Mechanical EngineeringNew ZealandUNIVS FALL (Canterbury)EngrMAE 30 AND EngrMAE 80ENGR 51Engr Mechanics
2015Mechanical EngineeringNew ZealandUNIVS FALL (Canterbury)Engr 54ME 127Materials Sci & Eng
Mechanical Engineering1st(Sep-December)Scotland Uni. of EdunburghTechnical ElectiveMECE09015Sustainable Energy:Principles and Processes 3 This course aims to establish a basic understanding of global patterns of energy use and systems of energy supply in the context of their sustainability: social environmental and economic. It is structured so as to familiarise students with the wide range of literature on sustainability and will develop independent study and analysis skills. More specifically; 1. To provide an overview the world's energy resources and the current patterns of the production and use of energy. 2. To examine the current world energy picture in the context of sustainability. 3. To present strategies for more sustainable supply and to consider the constraints on expansion of supply. 4. To discuss future sustainable energy scenarios 5. To develop an appreciation of the global nature of the issues and an accompanying appreciation of the need for local variations to be understood and accounted for 6. To develop a realisation of the intricacy and complexity of sustainable energy issues; to gain ability to critically appraise information in the sector and to detect and reject over simplified assertions and/or solutions.http://www.ed.ac.uk/study-abroad/course?year=2016%E2%80%942017&vcf-period=semester_1&vcf-college=SCE&vcf-subject=Mechanical&course=36377
Mechanical Engineering1st(Sep-December)Scotland Uni. of EdunburghTechnical ElectiveMECE10011Sustainable Energy Technologies 4 This course aims to provide an introduction to the engineering principles and designs underpinning key sustainable / renewable energy technologies. It is structured to familiarise students with an analytical toolkit to allow them to independently appraise such technologies and their role in the energy system.http://www.ed.ac.uk/study-abroad/course?year=2016%E2%80%942017&vcf-period=semester_1&vcf-college=SCE&vcf-subject=Mechanical&course=36389
Mechanical Engineering1st(Sep-December)Scotland Uni. of EdunburghTechnical ElectiveMECE10003Energy Systems 4The course applies the principles and techniques of thermodynamics to a variety of energy conversion systems including power plant combined heat and power systems and heat pumps. It provides an introduction to the engineering of fossil fuelled and nuclear power stations. It surveys the UK/international energy scene.http://www.ed.ac.uk/study-abroad/course?year=2016%E2%80%942017&vcf-period=semester_1&vcf-college=SCE&vcf-subject=Mechanical&course=36384
Mechanical Engineering1st(Sep-December)Scotland Uni. of EdunburghENGRMAE 115 Applied Engineering ThermodynamicsApplication of thermodynamic principles to compressible and incompressible processes representative of practical engineering problems; power cycles, refrigeration cycles, multicomponent mixtures, air conditioning systems, combustion, and compressible flow. Design of a thermodynamic process.MECE09010Thermodynamics 3The course presents thermodynamics as a real world subject and insists that there is a pattern to working with thermodynamics which is summarised as Principles Properties Processes. This pattern is applied to a variety of machines and devices including turbines reciprocating compressors nozzles power cycles air conditioning systems and cooling towers. A final separate section introduces the basic ideas of heat transfer.http://www.ed.ac.uk/study-abroad/course?year=2016%E2%80%942017&vcf-period=semester_1&vcf-college=SCE&vcf-subject=Mechanical&course=36374
2014Mechanical EngineeringSingaporeNUS FALLEngrMAE 52ME 118Eng Visual&Model
January 17, 2017Mechanical Engineering(Winter Quarter)1stSingaporeNational University of SingaporeENGRMAE 170. Introduction to Control Systems.Feedback control systems. Modeling, stability, and systems specifications. Root locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods of analysis and design.ME2142 Feedback Control Systemshttp://me.nus.edu.sg/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/NUSME_CoreModules_Oct2015.pdf
2014Mechanical EngineeringSingaporeNUS FALLEngrMAE 150 AND 150LENGR 30Statics&Mechan
January 17, 2017Mechanical Engineering(Winter Quarter)1stSingaporeNational University of SingaporeENGRMAE 115 Applied Engineering Thermodynamics(Can get credit as MAE112 Propulsion. 4 Units.) Application of thermodynamic principles to compressible and incompressible processes representative of practical engineering problems; power cycles, refrigeration cycles, multicomponent mixtures, air conditioning systems, combustion, and compressible flow. Design of a thermodynamic processME2121Engineering Thermodynamicshttp://me.nus.edu.sg/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/NUSME_CoreModules_Oct2015.pdf
2014Mechanical EngineeringSingaporeNUS FALLEngrMAE 115ME 122Engr Thermodynam
2014Mechanical EngineeringSingaporeNUS FALLEngrMAE 108or180or CBEMS 164ENGR 186AResearch Project
January 17, 2017Mechanical Engineering(Winter Quarter)1stSingaporeNational University of SingaporeENGRMAE 107. Fluid Thermal Science LaboratoryFluid and thermal engineering laboratory. Experimental analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer, and thermodynamic systems. Probability, statistics, and uncertainly analysis. Report writing is emphasized and a design project is required. Materials ME4234Experimental Methods in Fluid Mechanicshttp://me.nus.edu.sg/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/NUSME_TEMods_Oct2015.pdf
2014Mechanical EngineeringSwedenLUND FALLTech Elective (6 units)ME 123Vehicle Systems
January 18, 2017Mechanical EngineeringSwedenLund University MAE 150 Stresses and strains. Torsion. Bending. Beam deflection. Shear force and moment distributions in beams. Yielding and buckling of columns. Combined loading. Transformation of stresses and strain. Yielding criteria. Finite elements analysis of frames. Dynamic of two-bar truss.FHL013Solid MechanicsThe aim is to achieve such a knowledge within solid mechanics that every Master of Mechanical Engineering is expected to possess.http://kurser.lth.se/kursplaner/16_17%20eng/FHL013.html 
January 18, 2017Mechanical EngineeringSwedenLund University ENGRMAE 130A. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics.Fundamental concepts; fluid statics; fluid dynamics; Bernoulli's equation; control-volume analysis; basic flow equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; differential analysis; potential flow; viscous incompressible flow.VVR120 Fluid mechanicsThe objective of the course is to give a thorough knowledge in fluid mechanics with application for problems within hydraulics and water supply using earlier knowledge in calculus, mechanics, physics, and hydrology.http://kurser.lth.se/kursplaner/16_17%20eng/VVR120.html